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Series Diffs, “Rover” Vs “Salisbury”

Discussion in 'Series Land Rovers' started by Benz R'over, Dec 16, 2009.

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  1. Benz R'over

    Benz R'over New Member

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    Help needed on a decision for my 200Tdi engined ’59 SWB, (has turbo and intercooler)

    Backgraound:-
    My SWB is used for mainly road work, running Michelin X tyres, it’s a regular at pony club events towing a horse box, any off-roading is generally light field work, towing a topper/roller etc.

    The goal:-
    Friends left for South Africa last Saturday in their 2CV, (50 years of independence celebrations) and I’d like to undertake a similar expedition in the near future, of course taking my Land Rover with me, as part of the experience??

    I’ve started on some modifications to hopefully make it worthy of such a journey, but am stuck, regarding a back axle decision, so any input gratefully appreciated?

    I read everywhere that the Salisbury axle is the dogs danglies, but is it worth all the hassle?

    I have a Salisbury axle sitting, and the half shafts “are” lovely, but then again, I’ve never broken a spindly 10 spline shaft, even with the Tdi engine?

    So, one half of me says “Go for it, fit the Salisbury”, moving the mountings is not a problem, but I would be left with a non standard prop?
    However, the other half say’s “If I did have trouble with the Salisbury out on the road, I’d be pretty fek’d, and although the rover diff/halfshafts are weaker, at least they could be easily fixed with simple tools”

    Anyway, if the Salisbury axle was that good, why didn’t they fit them to V8 engined range rovers??

    Oh the things we find to worry about in the middle a recession?

    Again, any help, thought, experiences, gratefully appreciated?

    Ken
    Lockerbie
     
  2. jai_landrover

    jai_landrover Well-Known Member

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    Range rovers have perm 4wd so the torque is distributed between the front and rear axles. On a series when in 2wd the full torque is applied through the rear axle. Some military 109's have them A few special vehicles had them front and back they are bloody strong but again bloody heavy I rate them ALOT! but I have worked on them a fair bit and have the means to strip one down and repair if need be.
     
  3. 109party

    109party Well-Known Member

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    simple are they strong, yes
    are you more likely to brake a standard one off roading or is it not worth the bother,
    there is a less chance of you breaking them and even then you normally only brake a half shaft, not fook a diff, would i fit them for a overland defo, why just think the advantages outway the disadvantages in my opinion, mine has them and i would not think about changing them to standad and they have never gave me any problems, so il stick with old and reliable and tested by the military for toughness
     
  4. Benz R'over

    Benz R'over New Member

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    Many thanks for your help

    My thoughts had been to purchase an early 110 axle, then swap the diff/input shaft into the narrower series axle, basically making my own stage one axle (3.54:1) at a fraction of the cost of a stage one axle?
    My thoughts for not just “buying” a stage one axle, is that they would probably need the input seal done, so would end up stripping the thing anyway?

    However, everyone I’ve spoken to seems to relay the same tails of woe, the word “Salisbury” always seems to be followed by a sharp intake of breath?
    Making my own case spreader is not a problem, I have a dial gauge, so not to overstretch the case, and say, although I’ve never done a diff before, I was a reasonably competent mechanic, having never taken a vehicle to a garage for any work other than an mot, in my entire life?

    Are Salisbury’s as scary to set up as everyone suggests?

    Ken.
     
  5. Beast o Bodmin

    Beast o Bodmin Banned

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    never did like the welsh.....tom jones is also cra
    fit rangie classic axles...
     
  6. jai_landrover

    jai_landrover Well-Known Member

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    I have a 4.7 genuine rare 110 axle I intend to fit to mine once the better weather comes I have a 3.5 at the moment but the gearing is silly on and offroad. If you don't mind setting everything to a preload then it will ne ok most peeps on ere is unable to set preload and shimming correctly and stay well clear
     
  7. Benz R'over

    Benz R'over New Member

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    I&#8217;ve just been told that the last of the Range Rover Classics, fitted with ABS, had 24 spline diffs (3.54:1 ratio)?
    Does anybody know if I could fit one of these into my standard series axle tube, then fit series Salisbury halfshafts and drive flanges?
    This sounds the perfect solution to me, no silly Salisbury diff, standard propshaft, easily fixed with simple tools, yet I get rid of the weak 10 spline halfshafts??
    Ok, bought my first Land Rover when I was 19, (CSK 704,1950 series one, where is it now??) anyway, that was quite a few years ago, but my point is, I don&#8217;t have a great deal of knowledge of parts inter-changeability, so, am I missing the obvious?

    Ken
    Lockerbie.
     
  8. dantaylor360

    dantaylor360 New Member

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    A completely useless input as I know bugger all about diffs/axles but Ive got range rover diffs in my series using the original half shafts so thats no good! :S
     
  9. Jackual_NZ

    Jackual_NZ New Member

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    I made a thread about this same subject some months back, altho not about a series with TDi. After all the discussions and help from people, i stuck with the rover axles....and ive given it absolute sh*t offroading, im possibly just lucky that nothing has broken, knowing when to button off the accelerator is good practice. I have heard about the half shafts twisting up and eventually whilst on a roundabout or going round a corner the thing snaps...untill the day this happens the rover diff stays put:)
     
  10. Benz R'over

    Benz R'over New Member

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    Many thanks for your replies,

    Jackaul_NZ, I might end up sticking with the standard 10 spline diffs, everyone I’ve spoken to has said, by fitting stronger halfshafts, you’ll only move the problem to the next weakest link which is the diff itself, and it’s easier to carry halfshafts as spares on an expedition?

    I’m trying to keep as much as possible to standard parts, however, If going down this road, I may make a removable diff pan, so at least if a shaft breaks, I could poke the broken bit out without having to remove the diff from the axle case?

    I’ll let you know how I get on?

    Many thanks

    Ken.
     
  11. iannotts

    iannotts New Member

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    nothing to add but i have got a sailbury axle on the back off my 88 which has spent most of its life with a v8 in......
     
  12. fenby1976

    fenby1976 New Member

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    If you stick with the standard rear axle, then it would be a good idea to take both half shafts out and inspect them for twisting on the splines before you go on a trip, and obviouly take a spare pair with you. A Salisbury rear axle on an 88" is not ideal because the Salisbury diff as well as being longer is a hypoid design, so the diff pinion is offset below the centre line of the axle, which means that the propshaft will be working at a sharper angle and the UJs might bind under cerain conditions. On mine I compensated for this somewhat by welding the spring plates so that the front of the diff is 1" up from horizontal, but this means that the axis of the diff pinion and gearbox output shaft are no longer parallel, which causes vibration. A custom wide angle propshaft might be a good solution
     
  13. w3526602

    w3526602 Active Member

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    Hi,

    I understand that the axle is the weak point with a V8, and the gearbox is weak point with a TDi. Both caused by vibration, but different.

    I have a broken lay shaft behind my S2TD, and this seems to be not uncommon. The answer seems to be about £1000 of Ashcroft's finest. But not this week.

    602
     
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