1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Welcome To LandyZone!

    LandyZone is the biggest Land Rover forum on the net. We have plenty of very knowledgable members so if you have any questions about your Land Rover or just want to connect with other Landy owners, you're in the right place.

    Registering is free and easy just click here, we hope to see you on the forums soon!

K Series Head Bolts and HGF - tool info

Discussion in 'Common Faults and Questions' started by Northern Irelander, Dec 7, 2007.

< Previous Thread | Next Thread >
  1. Northern Irelander

    Northern Irelander Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Posts:
    2,890
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    N. Ireland
    Heres the DIY tools that help make life easy doing the hg repair, exclusive to this thread


    The flywheel locking tool bolts into the starter motor housing, sealey sell one for &#163;35 +vat for all that it is

    You only need the cam locking tool at the very end when placing on the belt. There are two types shown in the last attachment. A 10 x 10mm recess in a piece of metal strap interlocks the spokes on each sprocket.

    the M5 bolt one interlocks the teeth from the two sprockets

    Dimensions are from the centre of each bolt hole.

    The two cam sprockets lined up (reading left to right from inlet cam to exhaust cam) <EXHAUST -O- IN> <EXHAUST -O- IN> are under low pressure from the valve springs. They tend not to move although the locking tool keeps it all in check,


    If you are removing the sprockets from the cams, a long metal bar with two M8 or M10 strategically placed at a distance of 80mm or so will interlock the cam spokes. This allows some counter leverage from the spanner/socket drive. Just wrap some tape around the two bolts to prevent fouling on the cams.

    When the timing belt is replaced, tightened etc , remove all locking tools, rotate the crank several time by hand using the 22mm crank pulley nut. Re-allign the marks as before and re-check. sometimes the marks can be out by a tooth, apparently this is normal
    Attached Thumbnails
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Jrdinger

    Jrdinger New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Posts:
    44
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    N 36.062 W 96.023
    Very Nicely done, Northern Irelander. I will post my mods for the NAS KV6 when I get 'em built...
     
  3. The Mad Hat Man

    The Mad Hat Man Well-Known Member LZIR Despatch Agent

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Posts:
    83,064
    Likes Received:
    8,737
    Location:
    Embasinga stocæ
    good job, NI - but yu could have de-rusted em ;).
     
  4. Northern Irelander

    Northern Irelander Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Posts:
    2,890
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    N. Ireland
    Them is rusted for a reason, shiney stuff goes AWOL, from thieving magpies
     
  5. Northern Irelander

    Northern Irelander Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Posts:
    2,890
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    N. Ireland
    DIY flywheel locking tool in action!

    Pics not the best, taken in the dark!

    1. Starter motor removed, followed by inner flywheel cover.

    2. View of tool fitted from drivers side at the back of the engine. Note TOP of the tool in upper bolt hole.

    3. View of tool from battery side with starter motor removed.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 6, 2009
  6. Northern Irelander

    Northern Irelander Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Posts:
    2,890
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    N. Ireland
    The above tools in action, cam locking tools are only needed when fitting the belt back on, it is the flywheel locking tool above that is used from the outset, stops the crank slipping when the head is off (not what you want, never rotate the crank with the head off, liners with dislodge)

    Piccies

    1. Note position of the cam sprocket locating pins, this is the position when bolting the cam carrier back on to the head, inlet cam 4 oclock, exhaust cam 8 oclock

    2. Position of timing marks when sprocket bolted on

    3. cams rotated approx 25-30 degrees to read INLET CAM (Exhaust - In) EXHAUST CAM (Exhaust - In) The image is taken from a shaving mirror (working blind) text is upside down, note the central mark on the plastic cover being in sync.

    4. M5 bolt locking tool in position, each bolt sits 3 notches above or below the central timing mark

    5. or the metal strap version that interlocks the spokes

    6. Cams viewed with belt back on (there is a knack to fitting a belt, I work anti-clockwise, starting at crank pulley, then exhaust cam sprocket, followed by inlet and then the tensioner, keeping the belt taut and in place by wedging against the timing cover)

    7. Rotate the crank twice and line up the pulley mark with timing mark on lower cover 12 oclock position, check the timing marks, as in post 1 above, timing out by one tooth is acceptable
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 9, 2010
< Previous Thread | Next Thread >