1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Welcome To LandyZone!

    LandyZone is the biggest Land Rover forum on the net. We have plenty of very knowledgable members so if you have any questions about your Land Rover or just want to connect with other Landy owners, you're in the right place.

    Registering is free and easy just click here, we hope to see you on the forums soon!

Series 3 Carb problems

Discussion in 'Series Land Rovers' started by TheMegaMan, May 14, 2021.

< Previous Thread | Next Thread >
  1. TheMegaMan

    TheMegaMan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2019
    Posts:
    511
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Cambridge
    Yeah, I dare say filters weren't used years ago, but I really don't want to run without one. I would have though the v8 version would have been fairly high flow given its intended application, and it ran OK with one before the rebuild. I'm told the weber carb is particularly susceptible to blocked jets, so I was actually thinking of fitting a second (transparent style, so I can actually see the fuel flow, too).

    I'm using a new mechanical pump. I will check the glass bulb, but I've only a couple of tanks so far since the rebuild, so unless I've got some really bad petrol from somewhere, it should still be OK. I suspect it wasn't a very good quality pump, hence wondering what's the best source/brand to use. Moving to an electric pump has a lot of appeal...

    Col, did you go electric in the end? I found your thread from a few years ago... https://www.landyzone.co.uk/land-rover/electric-fuel-pump-or-not.333327/ What type/model did you use in the end?
     
  2. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2017
    Posts:
    8,309
    Likes Received:
    8,980
    Location:
    Thatcham
    I just bought some generic electric pump from ebay but it was too powerful and it caused leaks. I had bought a replacement mechanicl fuel pump which didnt seem to supply enough fuel causing problems similar to yours. I could have bought a fuel pressure reducer for the electric pump but eventually I gave the original pump a good clean and put it back on. If I dont use thelandy for a few weeks, the fuel in the carb evaporates and the fuel in the pipe between the carb and pump seems to flow back to the pump, so I have to either prime it by hand or have the starter turn over for several seconds to refill the fuel line, filter and float chamber. I start it more regularly now to prevent it.

    Col
     
  3. Hicap phill

    Hicap phill Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Posts:
    12,100
    Likes Received:
    28,407
    Location:
    Wiltshire
    Facet interrupter pump.
    These stop pumping & don’t over pressurise the system. Have a small glass tube filter which can be removed & cleaned.
    I have also used push fit conectors all fired to 2.25 petrol
     
  4. TheMegaMan

    TheMegaMan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2019
    Posts:
    511
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Cambridge
    Ah, OK. So electric pumps aren't necessarily the solution to all problems!

    I was thinking exactly that I should get a refurb kit for me original pump and stick that back on again. A whole new pump wasn't that much more expensive and seemed an easier swap, but I guess I've fallen into the quality trap...

    One of these? https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/361197622119?hash=item54190e5367:g:kXQAAOSw~gtdlyxX (Silver Road) Crikey, wasn't expecting quite that much...
     
  5. Hicap phill

    Hicap phill Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Posts:
    12,100
    Likes Received:
    28,407
    Location:
    Wiltshire
    Yep that’s the sort I have.
     
  6. Hicap phill

    Hicap phill Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Posts:
    12,100
    Likes Received:
    28,407
    Location:
    Wiltshire
    @TheMegaMan
    Have a look at that eBay seller he has some other type of pumps which are cheaper. They don’t have the internal filters so it’s best to have a pre filter so you don’t ruin the pump
     
  7. Stanleysteamer

    Stanleysteamer Well-Known Member Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Posts:
    24,603
    Likes Received:
    51,537
    Location:
    East Dorset
    I have given this a bit of thought and remembered a couple of things.
    Firstly make sure there is no water in the fuel, I had this and the car would only run properly with the choke out. You haven't said whether you have tried pulling the choke out when the engine falters.
    Secondly I once had exactly the same problems when I sold a car. I had to recover it and fix it for the new owners. Went through everything until I took the filter off, then it ran fine. The filter was choked with tiny rust particles as the tank had been welded up and to stop it exploding when my mate welded it, I had washed it out. In the time before I got it back this dampness in an empty tank led to surface rust. New filter, no probs.
    Lastly don't forget you can eliminate fuel pump issues by fixing up a gravity feed tank, OK it isn't a long term solution but it the car runs fine with it you can then work your way back from the carb.
    Best of luck mate.:):):)
     
  8. TheMegaMan

    TheMegaMan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2019
    Posts:
    511
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Cambridge
    I will check the bowl, but I'm pretty sure there's no water around. I've not explicitly tried choking it when it's spluttering, although the choke has 'felt right' as it warms up. I'll also check the filter.

    That's an interesting idea about using a small gravity tank. I'll try and lash something up. It's still only a theory that it's the pump, and I'm a bit loathed to spend £80+ on a hunch. The tank might prove it one way or the other. Or the cheaper pumps at £20 might be worth a punt. I'd not expect them to be as reliable as a proper Facet pump, but it might at least prove the point before investing quite so much.

    Thanks for the suggestions and ideas, chaps.
     
  9. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2017
    Posts:
    8,309
    Likes Received:
    8,980
    Location:
    Thatcham
    When I decided to clean out my old pump, I had a lot of trouble getting the glass bowl to seat properly. It was as if the rubber gasket had grown a couple of millimeters. I eventually took the gasket from the new pump and fitted it to the old one before reassembling it and fitting it back on to the engine.

    Col
     
    kermit_rr and Stanleysteamer like this.
  10. Stanleysteamer

    Stanleysteamer Well-Known Member Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Posts:
    24,603
    Likes Received:
    51,537
    Location:
    East Dorset
    I think that is quite typical, don't know what they are made of, maybe not nitrile, but I have heard of seals swelling after years of use.
     
  11. kermit_rr

    kermit_rr Green Member Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2018
    Posts:
    16,584
    Likes Received:
    19,517
    Location:
    North Shropshire
    Ethanol can cause some seals/hoses to swell
     
    Stanleysteamer likes this.
  12. TheMegaMan

    TheMegaMan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2019
    Posts:
    511
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Cambridge
    Yeah, I've had this several times, too. I assume it depends on the exact type of rubber used, but yes, petrol does make it expand. Very annoying.
     
    kermit_rr likes this.
  13. Turboman

    Turboman Rural Activist

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Posts:
    53,841
    Likes Received:
    55,481
    Location:
    Continuously Cruising
    Personally, I haven't had a problem with mechanical lift pumps, Britpart are OK. If you can find a kit, you can also remove the pump and rebuild it, it is a simple job.

    I am not a lover of Weber carbs on Landrovers, they usually work, but also reduce performance. Doubt if that is the cause of your original issue, though.
     
    kermit_rr and Colthebrummie like this.
  14. Stanleysteamer

    Stanleysteamer Well-Known Member Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Posts:
    24,603
    Likes Received:
    51,537
    Location:
    East Dorset
    Weber carbs are great but feckin complex compared to an SU and on a Landy especially a Series I wouldn't bother, much better suited to a performance vehicle.
     
  15. Turboman

    Turboman Rural Activist

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Posts:
    53,841
    Likes Received:
    55,481
    Location:
    Continuously Cruising
    There are many kinds of Weber, none of which are made for Land Rovers. The ones people put on Land Rovers are a generic carb, made for engines in about that capacity range.
    The choke size and jets are actually slightly smaller than a Solex or Zenith carb, resulting in slightly worse performance, but slightly better fuel economy.

    Always better to stay with Solex or Zenith if at all possible.
     
    Colthebrummie likes this.
  16. Stanleysteamer

    Stanleysteamer Well-Known Member Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Posts:
    24,603
    Likes Received:
    51,537
    Location:
    East Dorset
    Quite.
    If the manufacturer designed the engine to work with a certain carb they usually got it right.
    I once bought a Cortina Mk1 that the previous owner, an engineer bizarrely, had put an "economy" carb on.
    An SU. It was sh!t. Made it slow and certainly no more economical. A bigger one might actually have been better!
    I believe there is a whole Haynes manual dedicated to Webers, and there needs to be. The blank looks you get off some peeps when you say the words "emulsion tube". they think you are talking about paint!
    The kit car world, especially those running Ford engines, love em to bits altho some substitute Delortos as they are similar but cheaper.

    But I wish wifey's Speedster didn't have twin Webers on. runs like cr@p especially when hot and I haven't got the inclination to sort it out, altho I'll have to to get it sold.:rolleyes:
     
  17. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2017
    Posts:
    8,309
    Likes Received:
    8,980
    Location:
    Thatcham
    When you say 'twin webers' do you mean twin choke weber? I had one of those fitted to a mk 3 cortina, it was like having a bucket on a hinge in terms of fuel economy

    Col
     
    Hicap phill likes this.
  18. Stanleysteamer

    Stanleysteamer Well-Known Member Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Posts:
    24,603
    Likes Received:
    51,537
    Location:
    East Dorset
    Ha Ha!
    The twin choke Weber, if you use the pressure of the loud pedal to tell you when you are about to open the second choke, can be quite economical, I have had many Cortinas and Capris with them and even an Opel Manta A series. But yes, if you drive it pedal-to-the-metal it will drink the stuff.

    But when I say twin Webers, these are the ones fitted to many performance Fords where you get a barrel per pot, so two Webers, four barrels on a four pot Pinto.
    The last kit car I built had a tuned Pinto engine, went like a train and as I built the engine first then ran it in, in an old Mk 4 Cortina, it frightened the cr@p out of a few BMW drivers, a real sleeper. But I still got 30 to the gal on a run, as I kept the stock twin choke Weber on it.
    But you cannot expect better than that, even on a 1600. (Mine is a 2000.)
    MPG is personal. I'm old fashioned and to me anything better than 30mpg is a bonus!
     
    kermit_rr and Colthebrummie like this.
  19. Stanleysteamer

    Stanleysteamer Well-Known Member Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2013
    Posts:
    24,603
    Likes Received:
    51,537
    Location:
    East Dorset
    [​IMG]

    = twin Webers
     
  20. kermit_rr

    kermit_rr Green Member Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2018
    Posts:
    16,584
    Likes Received:
    19,517
    Location:
    North Shropshire
    SU carbs rule :D
     
< Previous Thread | Next Thread >