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Paint versus powder coating: which is best?

Discussion in 'Land Rover Freelander' started by rob_bell, Feb 19, 2022.

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  1. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    Question as per title: I’m going to recondition some subframes and will get them shot blasted to get rid of all the flaking surface rust.

    not sure whether to powder coat at the same time or paint?

    powder coating is tougher, but if chipped can trap moisture and exacerbate rusting (or so I’ve read - seems plausible looking at cheap metal garden furniture).

    What is the consensus view on this? I had planned on powder coat but might just paint now…
     
  2. andyfreelandy

    andyfreelandy Well-Known Member

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    I did half and half!!
    Powder coated springs and subframes and roll bar. Painted hubs and adjustable arms to save having to remove bearings and clog threads.

    Subframes still perfect, zinc based paint already rusting.
    Yes powder can allow moisture under if split, but not seen it if we'll done. Cheap furniture gets, well, a cheap coating.
    Also, you can zinc primer powder for a better undercoat and protection.
     
  3. Wimblowdriver

    Wimblowdriver Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Cheap garden furniture made out of chinesium is nothing to go by. Cheap low quality steel will corrode from the inside out due to impurities within and the coating will fall off. Powder coating will outlast paint coats many times over. Provided the steel quality is good and the powder coating is done diligently.
    Powder coatings can be repaired with a touch up paint but its unsightly (used to do it on industrial fabricated coated process pipework). Both powder coated finish and wet paint finish will chip and need repairs when this happens.
     
  4. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys - that’s really reassuring. I’ll aim to keep with plan A, so long as it is affordable to powder coat the subframes (Londinium tax!)

    I’ll get some quotes…
     
  5. kernowsvenski

    kernowsvenski Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if this is helpful or not, but I work in highways, and we stopped using powder coated street furniture a long time ago. We weren't using cheap Chinese stuff but it did used to crack and the steel beneath would rot due to the reslting moisture ingress. I suspect that UV was the problem causing the powder coating to fail so a subframe may well be just fine!
     
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  6. Nodge68

    Nodge68 Well-Known Member

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    I'd chose Bonda primer applied to grit blasted steel instead power coat any day.
    Power coat is applied to untreated grit blasted steel, which if chipped, will corrode, often unseen.
    Bonda primer simply doesn't come off grit blasted steel, so even if a top coat comes off due to impact, the Bonda primer holds fast, preventing rust.
     
  7. kermit_rr

    kermit_rr Green Member Full Member

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    The thing with powder coating, everything you don't want done, has to come off and you can't touch it up. Well, you can, but it won't last
     
  8. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    Thanks - hmmm - still not sure which way to go now… blast the frames definitely, but whether to paint or coat?

    I’ll get quotes and consider the time I’d need to invest…
     
  9. kermit_rr

    kermit_rr Green Member Full Member

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    I'd paint, easier to repair/touch up as and when necessary
     
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  10. Nodge68

    Nodge68 Well-Known Member

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  11. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    Thanks! That sounds like a good plan :D
     
  12. Alibro

    Alibro Well-Known Member Full Member

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    I remember seeing a TVR (on Wheeler Dealers I think) where the chassis had been powder coated and still rusted very badly.
    What about having it galvanised?
     
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  13. andyfreelandy

    andyfreelandy Well-Known Member

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    I did look at galvanising. Heat and distortion is the enemy. Not really substantial enough to take the process.
     
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  14. Alibro

    Alibro Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Go with Nodge's suggestion then. ;)
     
  15. potus

    potus Well-Known Member

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    I'm guessing you might want a nice smooth finish but if not, what about the paint landylee used on the underside of his tub.
    Its a mottled paint which would cover impurities, Raptor. Probably more suited to wheel arches though if I'm honest.
    Otherwise a nice hardwearing 2 pack black..
     
  16. Andy Warren

    Andy Warren Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Hi Nodge, is that Bonda primer quite thick (or on the thin side) ? Now I've had the rear quarter replaced on my D2 I intend to do the rest of the chassis & some bits on the FL. I have used that Omnicote stuff which goes a long way so was wondering if I could getaway with a litre, cheers.
     
  17. Nodge68

    Nodge68 Well-Known Member

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    It's about the same viscosity as good quality emulsion paint.
    Bonda primer does settle out in storage, and if it appears thin, with need thorough mixing, as the thicker components settle to the bottom.
     
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  18. Andy Warren

    Andy Warren Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Thanks for that, it sounds a bit thicker than the Omnicote stuff so I'll order a litre for when the weather's warmer (soon I hope):).
     
  19. Nodge68

    Nodge68 Well-Known Member

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    It is quite thick, but it's thin enough to creep into gaps between panels, and protect from rust between them.
    Bonda works best on blasted or heavily abraded metal, and not applied over a rust treatment, which coats the metal.
    I'd remove rust by mechanical means, then apply an acid rust killer to remove all traces of rust. The metal can then be dried thoroughly, and the Bonda applied with a brush.
    Once applied, its very difficult to remove, so only apply it to where you want it. ;)
     
  20. Turboman

    Turboman Rural Activist

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