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L322 M62 Rebuild.

Discussion in 'Range Rover' started by Henry_b, Nov 10, 2018 at 6:49 PM.

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  1. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    Don't know how comprehensible this'll be so bear with me and read it slowly ;)

    After this exercise you can say i'm an l322 fan ;)

    #1 Building the heads..

    The cylinder heads on this engine were cleaned and checked for any warping before building..

    The bare head.

    [​IMG]


    New stem seals below, these are easy as pie to fit just place over lip aove the valve guide and give 'em a tap.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Below is all the components that have to be assembled on to the head.

    [​IMG]


    The Tappets on this engine, naturally were empty of all the oil. To prevent any rattling and undue wear i managed to disassemble and re prime them.

    [​IMG]

    In the picture above you can see the small plunger/piston in the middle, to reprime them you have to pull this out.
    A small pair of vice grips will see them removed, once the piston is out you have to pull that apart, aswell.
    Inside this little plunger is a small spring and check valve, don't lose the spring!!

    Clean the tappet bore and little plunger/piston with brake cleaner or iso alcohol to ensure all sludge and varnish is removed.

    The little plunger should be half filled with oil which is a minuscule amount, and the bore where it sits in the tappet should also be filled, once this is done refit the little plunger to the tappet.
    At this point the plunger should be almost solid in the tappet with no movement.

    Also at this point make sure the face of the tappet where the cam lose hits is in good condition.
    [​IMG]


    2# Valves.

    In this particular instance new valves were acquired, before fitment they had to be ground to the valve seats to ensure a good seal!

    The compound i used was a rather unaggressive type, it only took 2mins per valve so clearly it was the right stuff..
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Once all the valves were properly ground to the head the valve springs have to be fitted

    These little Bástards are taper'd and the taper goes towards the valve, these are right pains to fit so make sure your parkinsons doesn't flare up when you try to fit them like mine did. ;)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The spring compressor in this case was rather unwieldy!! ;)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And fitted, that only took way longer than it should of!!

    After double checking everything, fit the primed tappets onto the valve springs, I oriented the oil feed hole in the tappets to the one in the block to ensure maximum oil flow during its first initial start.

    [​IMG]


    Then fit the cam, I coated the cam bearings in assembly lubricant before fitting, for anyone wondering the securing bolts are 11mm.

    [​IMG]

    Next its the vanos which is a pain in the hoop to set up.
    Underneath this unit is a gasket for the love of god make sure it isn't bent and also fit a new one, don't reuse the old one, the securing bolts were 13mm

    A new cam chain tensioner was also fitted.
    [​IMG]

    Below is the sprocket, this was checked and is in good order.

    [​IMG]

    And fitted
    Don't be an idiot the securing bolt is left hand thread, what a dope i am..
    [​IMG]

    Next

    Tighten down the spocket retaining bolt "left hand thread" this is to seat the spocket,

    #2 loosen the bolts back off 1/8 of a turn this allows them to rotate freely which is needed to set up the timing.

    #3 Fit the cam chain and unlock the cam chain tensioner, compress the tensioner and pull out the clip from the locking holes, this is for all the tensioner btw,

    #4 Install crankshaft chain locking tool
    1 Thread the tool's spindle nut fully into tool block
    2 Mount the tool block with upper timing long bolt at the top and the short one at the bottom
    3 Align block with head to facilitate the insersion of the bolt
    4 Lightly tighten the bolts.
    5 Tighten tensioner tool spindle to press against chain rail guide and tension crankshaft chain
    6 Check to make sure the crankshaft chain is positioned on chain rail guides
    7 Tighten until it become too difficult to further tighten.
    8 The amount off chain tightening and thread showing will depend on age and stretch of the chain.
    9 Make sure the chain is tight in all segemrnt
    10 Check and align camshafts and camsgaft locking blocks as needed.
    11 press down on the cams while rocking back and forward to fully seat block on head surface
    12 loosen and retghten locking blocks bolts as needed to make sure the block mounts correctly.

    13 Fully retard bank 1 and 2 cam timing, for each vanos perform the below..

    1 Connect Ohm meter to positive lead to one of the vanos test pins
    2 and connect negative lead to intake camshafts first beafing cam stud
    3 Turn on the OHM meter
    4 Install vanos tool on centre vanos shaft, insert pins into correct vanos shift pin holes
    5 Turn vanos shaft counter clockwise until end adjustment position is reached
    6 Vanos internal piston will connect with vanos test pins when fully retarded and cause a short reading 0 ohms
    7 When ratchet pressure is released ohm reading can shift to open circuit " Infinite ohm" this is ok.

    Locking of engine timing.

    erform following two steps in two passes. First pass lightly tighten vanos and exhaust sprocket mounting bolts to fix timing. Second pass fully tighten vanos and exhaust sprocket mounting bolts.
    Mounting bolt tightening torque values are high and set timing can be disturbed in tightening process. Two pass tightening allows fixing set timing at first pass then fully tightening at second when timing can’t be disturbed.


    Tighten bank 1 & 2 vanos mounting bolt. For each vanos perform following.
    Tighten bank 2 then bank 1. This assures any chain looseness it drawn to chain tensioner.
    Counter hold intake camshaft and fully tighten vanos mounting bolt, first pass 20 Nm (15 ft-lb), second pass 110 Nm (81 ft-lb); left hand thread (T55 torx bit socket 3/8″ w/ 1/2” to 3/8” socket adapter / 1/2″ torque wrench, 27mm open wrench).
    Make sure tool inserts fully into vanos bolt head (T55 torx bit 3/8”).
    Ensure Intake camshaft is counter held by locking block. But do not rely on this alone as camshaft can be damaged. Further counter hold camshaft at camshaft hex.

    Check and realign camshafts and camshaft locking blocks as necessary.




    Tighten bank 1 & 2 exhaust sprocket mounting bolt. For each exhaust sprocket perform following.
    Tighten bank 2 then bank 1. This assures any chain looseness it drawn to chain tensioner.
    Counter hold exhaust camshaft and fully tighten exhaust sprocket mounting bolt, first pass 20 Nm (15 ft-lb), second pass 125 Nm (92 ft-lb); left hand thread (T55 torx bit socket 3/8″ w/ 1/2” to 3/8” socket adapter / 1/2″ torque wrench, 27mm open wrench).
    Check to Verify tool inserts fully into sprocket bolt head (T55 torx bit 3/8”).
    Make sure: Exhaust camshaft is counter held by locking block. But do not rely on this alone as camshaft can be damaged. Further counter hold camshaft at camshaft hex.

    Check and realign camshafts and camshaft locking blocks as necessary.




    Mount bank 1 & 2 intake camshaft timing wheel. For each timing wheel perform following.
    Mount timing wheel on vanos mounting bolt and install mounting nut; left hand thread.
    Timing wheel rear has center protruding neck which mounts into vanos.
    Do not tighten mounting nut at this time.
    Rotate timing wheel to position reference hole approximately.




    Install bank 1 & 2 timing wheel positioning tool. For each timing wheel perform following.
    Mount corresponding timing wheel positioning tool at timing cover head surface and insert tool pin in timing wheel hole. Rotate timing wheel as needed for pin/hole alignment.
    Mount positioning tool with upper timing cover long bolt at top and short bolt at bottom. Rest positioning tool top bracket on head top to align positioning tool and facilitate bolt insertion. Do not fully tighten bolts at this time.
    Precisely align positioning tool by aligning top bracket onto head top surface. Lightly tighten mounting bolts (10mm socket 3/8” / 3/8” extension).




    Tighten bank 1 & 2 timing wheel mounting nut. For each timing wheel perform following.
    Fully tighten timing wheel mounting nut, 40 Nm (29.5 ft-lb); left hand thread (24mm socket 1/2″ / 1/2″ torque wrench).

    Remove bank 1 & 2 timing wheel positioning tool mounting bolts and remove positioning tools (10mm socket 3/8” / 3/8” extension).


    Loosen chain tensioning tool spindle (8mm socket 1/4″ / fingers).
    Remove tool block 2 mounting bolts and remove chain tensioning tool (10mm socket 3/8” / 3/8” extension).
    Remove tool spindle nut from tool block.

    Unlocking of camshafts




    Remove bank 1 & 2 camshaft locking blocks. For each camshaft set perform following.
    Loosen locking blocks matting bolt (6mm hex bit socket 3/8” / 3/8” ratchet).
    Dislodge and remove locking blocks.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018 at 8:02 PM
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  2. gold rover

    gold rover Well-Known Member

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    Ok stop teasing, what was No13 ;)
     
  3. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    Bottom end and block..

    Yes i have done this in the wrong order since i just explained how to set up the cam timing..

    Gimmie a break!! lol ;)

    The block..

    This block is a lined unit from what i understand, it was also only sleeved on 6 out of 8 cylinders!
    don't ask me why!! :mad:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Its amazing the lack of material between each bore!!
    [​IMG]


    This is a picture of the crank journals prior to any bearing been fitted.
    [​IMG]

    The original bearings were re-used as they seemed to be in good condition
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The crank itstelf was in perfect condition and only required a light clean.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The crank and bearings are in 50% of the way there. ;)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    the crank bolts are 13mm, from memory.

    Main bearing bolts
    M10 / M11 Jointing torque 20 Nm
    M10 torque angle 70 degrees
    M11 torque angle 100 degrees

    Connecting rods and bearings, Replace wash and oil screws
    Application torque 5Nm
    Jointing torque 20Nm
    Torque angle 80 degrees
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Cylinder head bolts M60 / M62 / Screws have to be replaced, do not wash off coating.
    Jointing torque 30 Nm
    Torque angle 80 degrees plus 80 degrees
    Cam shaft bearing cap M6 bolts 10Nm, M7 bolts 14Nm,
    M8 bolts 20 Nm

    Handy pic
    [​IMG]


    Oil pump and 2 right side oil pump mounting bolts.
    Bolts: (20-24Nm).
    Sprocket. Bolt: (47 Nm)
    Adjust the chain sag to (8-12mm)


    End cover, top rear (water jacket) to engine block
    10Nm

    End cover, rear to crankcase
    10Nm Valley pan 10Nm
     
  4. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    This is the sticky shít i used.

    [​IMG]


    And more torque specs

    [​IMG]
    Timing case and timing case cover top and bottom
    Water pump and alternator
    M6 10Nm
    M7 15Nm
    M8 20Nm
    M10 47Nm


    [​IMG]

    Upper timing case to cylinder head M6 10Nm





    [​IMG]

    9- Solenoid valve on distributor 25Nm

    # 12- Left-hand thread: Exhaust chain wheel to exhaust camshaft 125Nm

    # 6- Left-hand thread: VANOS adjustment unit to inlet camshaft
    110Nm

    # 8- Left-hand thread: Nut of sensor gear screw fitting
    40Nm





    Etc

    Shamefully i haven't got a pic f the finished product, but she went in and fired up first time!!

    chuffed i was!!

    no rattles or bangs!!

    fitting it is a mare but its just like a big puzzle i like to think i would have an early l322 4.4 in the future!

    Lovely sounding motors they're!! :)
     
  5. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    I like to tease ;) :D:D:D:D
     
  6. gold rover

    gold rover Well-Known Member

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    Did you change it when I wasn't looking, you naughty little rascal? Or have I finally lost the plot?
     
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  7. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    i changed it!!
    ;)
    he he

    Ya ain't losing the plot!! :D
     
  8. gold rover

    gold rover Well-Known Member

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    I knewd you was a rascal ;)
     
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  9. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    Rascal, that's me! ;)
     
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  10. holidaychicken

    holidaychicken Well-Known Member

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    Nice work , what pistons and rings did you use in the lined bores compared to the original Alusil bores / Mahle ferrocoat pistons ?
     
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  11. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    Cheers.

    mahle pistons were used..

    Quite a few ring lands were broken on the old pistons trying to remove stuck rings. ;)


    . ;)
     
  12. holidaychicken

    holidaychicken Well-Known Member

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    That's interesting as when i researched rebuilding the M62 I looked at using Alusil liners which are only ok for one or two cylinders and not next to each other is the advice so the only option is steel or iron but I was put off doing that as I was told you had to use different pistons and rings in steel compared to the ones used for the alusil. Maybe it works using the original pistons and rings in steel but not the other way round of using steel pistons and rings in the Alusil. i know the ferrocoat iron coating on the Mahle Alusil pistons is to prevent the aluminum to aluminum galling but that wouldn't be a problem running in the steel liner. The Alusil rings are designed specially to run in the Alusil block but again that may be fine running steel as well.
    I'd be really interested in your compression readings now and in 500 - 1000 miles as i have a 4.4 block that has 7 knackered bores that I could potentially salvage with iron liners

    Good information above, i will be needing that when or if i get my project engine to that stage ..
     
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  13. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    Because of the way the block has been repaired 6 liners and 2 alusil we opted to use Mahle for simplicity, as using 2 standard and 6 mahle wouldn't make much sense ;)

    I'm sure they'll be ok and i'll keep you upto date ;)
     
  14. jamesmartin

    jamesmartin Well-Known Member

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    whats the story about 6 sleeves and 2 non, it seems very odd
     
  15. Henry_b

    Henry_b Well-Known Member

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    Yes i thought the same..

    This l322 is on its 4th engine, apparently .

    This block is a 2nd hand unit and for whatever reason only 6 out of 8 bores were lined which makes no sense tbh

    The supplier simply said it only needed those 6 doing, which makes no sense considering that getting all 8 done wouldn't of cost the earth. ;)
     
  16. wammers

    wammers STILL BREATHING. Donater

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    BMW had a lot of engine failures in Alusil blocks in their early days. Possibly the engine has been back to them and doctored.
     
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  17. jamesmartin

    jamesmartin Well-Known Member

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    im no expert on these engines so was interested in reasoning,its normal to do all as liners have an interference fit 3-4 thou this creates stress and an engine block ,especially an ali v8 should have equal stresses throughout,apart from two different surfaces should require different rings id have thought
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2018 at 11:35 AM
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  18. wammers

    wammers STILL BREATHING. Donater

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    BMW copied the Alusil blocks Porsche used on the 928 and didn't make a very good job of it.
     
  19. holidaychicken

    holidaychicken Well-Known Member

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    The main failures were down to Nikasil coated aluminium blocks in the earlier BMW engines the same as most Porsches had I believe caused by high sulphur fuels at the time.
    The block would have been bored with a torque plate in place you would think.
    I would have thought liners in all cylinders would have made sense as they butt up against each other at the top and are shrink fitted in to try and overcome the differential in heat expansion between the aluminium and the steel/ iron as pressing them in would crack the aluminium block.
     
  20. Moron

    Moron Well-Known Member

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    Still happens now....
     
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