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Series 3 Essential tool kit for home mechanic?

Discussion in 'Series Land Rovers' started by 85Santana3, Apr 27, 2021.

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  1. 85Santana3

    85Santana3 Active Member

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    Hello
    What do you think is necessary to have at home to be able to do 80% (level of difficulty and complication also) of mechanical works? Please be specific for example if you say "wrench", add the numbers also. It would be great if you mention the occasion that tool would be used if it is not common or obvious.
    I have come to conclusion that either I have to do the work myself or find a good way to hide mechanics' bodies :)
     
  2. lynall

    lynall Well-Known Member Full Member

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    The list is literally endles, and depends entirely on what works you plan to do.
    Simple servicing = simple basic tools.
    But tbh there is not much you cannot do on a series with just a basic tool kit.

    Some stuff you will want two of, for example spanners, ie 1 spanner on the bolt head and the other spanner on the nut, floor plates/wing to front panel etc
    Buy cheap crap and as/if you break (cheap stuff is actually pretty good for diy) it just replace the broken ones with better stuff.

    A good starting point would be one of the large blow moulded tool cases you can get with spanners sockets included.
     
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  3. flat

    flat Well-Known Member

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    start with a good set of spanners and sockets, or one of those 100 piece tool kits from halfrods etc.
    Then add to it as you go when need specific sizes or tools.

    watch out though, when i brought my 90 ten years ago i had just a normal cantilever toolbox, now i have 18 drawer tool chest and a tool cupboard :D
     
  4. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

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  5. marksman

    marksman Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Oil absorbent pads
    Sticking plasters
    Splints
    Credit card (maybe this should be at the top of the list)


    Seriously
    As above a general purpose tool kit (Halfrauds etc) with sockets and spanners, allen keys etc
    and +1 for a second set of spanners
     
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  6. Beneagles

    Beneagles Well-Known Member Full Member

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    These:


    :D New besties.JPG
     
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  7. dag019

    dag019 Well-Known Member

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    Trolley jack and axle stands
    Halfords ratchet set
    3ft breaker bar
    full set of imperial spanners
    pliers set
    mole grips
    screw driver set
    hammer and punch set

    The above will get you a good start and be able to do most jobs and then buy more specific tools as when you need them to do specific jobs. I do not regret a penny I have ever spent on tools. the best example I have for that is the first time i did the timing belt on my 110. It cost me more to buy the tools than it would have to get the garage to do the job but I have done it about 5 times since which save a lot of money.
    i would also echo @flat regarding the size of the tools box, I have done the same thing. Started off as a student with a halfords set and now have a full roller cabinet and overspill boxes all over the garage. Once you have a the basics above if you get to a job you need a specific tools for you buy it and keep it.
    Also always buy the best quality tools you can afford. I disagree with the above about getting a cheap set. The halford professionals sets are reasonably priced, come with a lifetime warranty, and they do swap them over when broken with no issue. Cheap tools make a job harder and more frustrating.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2021
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  8. rynner

    rynner Active Member

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    common sense and mechanicle ability,to be honest if you are lacking in either you should let a pro earn their crust,after all their kids need shoes the same as anybodys,
    the tools can be bought as you go along,
    ryn
     
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  9. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

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    Good tow rope, good jump leads and AA membership is all you really need. Oh, and maybe a mobile phone so you can call the wife to tell her you are going to be late home. An umbrella can also be useful when you are stood at the side of the road in the pouring rain. Plan for the worst, hope for the best.

    Col
     
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  10. tottot

    tottot Well-Known Member

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    Two special items. A prop shaft nut tool and a hub nut box spanner. Both available on line and not expensive. Both save skinned knuckles and filling of the swear box.:)
     
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  11. V8bob

    V8bob Active Member

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    I would suggest you go to Canada tire and tell them your budget.
    Look out for the old guy with grubby fingers!
    I don’t know what vehicle you have, so don’t know if you will need both metric and imperial.
    They do some decent stuff at sometimes reasonable prices.
     
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  12. Tenebreaux

    Tenebreaux Well-Known Member Full Member

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    One of those extending gizmos with a magnet on the end.
     
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  13. Dr Strangeglove

    Dr Strangeglove Active Member

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    I am crap with tool sets unless they have a specific and obvious place for everything, as that way when you finish you can see what is missing and then go and look for it until you call it a day. Otherwise the tool I use the most I loose the most!

    I find older tools are better than newer cheep tools. Also, try and identify which but and bolts you need to fit and get one for each end otherwise it's just gonna turn the seised not on the other end.

    I am not a believer in cheep mole grips or adjustables as I find the just are not up to the job.

    I am just starting on this journey myself but I do have lots of kit collected over the years. I have a defender and have used the 10, 13, 17 lots with one for each end. Also a 14 and 19 - but all this is minor stuff up to now. I haven't looked at any of the major nuts and bolts that are steering, suspension, bush related.

    I too got a 3ft breaker bar which is useful for the wheelnuts but also used on the M12 bulkhead bolts.

    I don't know if you have Lidl where you are but I have just purchased their impact wrench, which is just about ok, and their bare drill and a spare 4ah battery. Those came to £105 all together. The impact wrench is not massively powerful, but it can be useful to undo things that you would struggle to work with due to contortionist positions!

    A reasonable socket set is helpful too.

    But I am a novice too so please take any of my suggestions with caution!

    Good luck.

    M
     
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  14. Mik87

    Mik87 Member

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    AF spanners and sockets as well as metric, depending on which Landy. Use the proper size spanner/socket, not a metric one that is 'close enough'. A drain plug tool if you have a Series with slotted drain plugs, and an 8-point 1/2 inch socket makes loosening those 'outie' square plugs a breeze. Also agree with buying old tool as well as new ones. Also have a tool roll you keep in the vehicle. And a can of proper penetrant such as Plusgas, much better than WD40 for loosening nuts etc, though WD40 has its uses. A bottle jack to carry in the vehicle, and a 2+ ton trolley jack for use in the garage. Plus axle stands. Obviously.
     
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  15. Dr Strangeglove

    Dr Strangeglove Active Member

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    Axle stands and jack's definitely. Make sure they go high enough. The bottle jack out of my old RRC is good.
     
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  16. 85Santana3

    85Santana3 Active Member

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    I had a series of old Japanese motorcycles from 70s and 80s and they each come with a little tool kit under the seat that despite their economy of size and number of items let you do an incredible number of tasks if the bike break down unexpectedly (For you red blooded British bike fans I must add that unfortunately in Canada Triumph, BSA or other such options are very very rare and expensive, way beyond my budget at the time)

    Can we cut down the suggested items to a minimalist essentials?
    Surely we do not need to carry a 50 piece sucket set if most LR bolts are #13, #15 and #9 (for example).
    I ask this not only because I hate to spend more than I have to (although that is a fact) but also the kit could be kept handy in the truck when needed.
     
  17. raywin

    raywin Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Another vote for the halfords tool kits, the Pro ones have a lifetime guarantee (keep the receipts safe) I bought the big one just to have everything in one place next to you when working, saves rummaging through drawer
     
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  18. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

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    As well as tools, I carry a couple of spare spark plugs, an HT lead, a fan belt, some suitable wire and connectors, and a small roll of strong tape.

    Col
     
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  19. dag019

    dag019 Well-Known Member

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    That is a very different question. Tool kit in the garage is not the same as tool kit carried in the vehicle. Also although a more expensive option I am not a fan of transferring tools between the two and instead have a duplicate tool kit that stays in the vehicle and a full tool kit in the garage. I do not carry anything other than an AA card in the vehicle in the series but this is more of a weekend vehicle. The 110 which is a daily driver has the following in the vehicle at all times, which you will notice is more or less the same as the basic tool kit I recommended as a starter in my previous post.

    Tools (all Halfords professional) all kept in a canvas tool roll with large items between the seats and bulkhead:
    Full set af ring spanners
    full set metric ring spanners
    large adjustable spanner
    pliers
    needle nose pliers
    metric allen keys
    imperial allen keys
    stanley knife
    Large blade screwdriver
    ratchet screwdriver with set of mixed bits
    Small metric socket set
    3ft breaker bar
    27mm socket
    bottle jack
    tow rope

    Parts:
    cable ties
    couple of lengths of wire
    lift pump
    alternator belt
     
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  20. Gord Wedman

    Gord Wedman Well-Known Member

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    As suggested earlier, watch for tool kit sales at Canadian Tire. I bought a kit with 4 panels of tools for something like $40. Metric and Standard wrenches and sockets as well as other tools. Whenever I go off-roading I take this and a supplemental kit with multimeter, cable ties, JB Weld, etc.
    You do need a 3 foot breaker bar and socket for the wheels.
    A cordless electric impact wrench can really speed up big jobs. You can crack things loose by hand if necessary and then spin them off in no time.
    Special tools you buy as needed. Amazon or eBay
     
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