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Series 2A good to great

Discussion in 'Series Land Rovers' started by VictorVictor, Apr 17, 2021.

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  1. VictorVictor

    VictorVictor New Member

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    Hi all, new member - first post! I recently bought a series 2A in decent condition and over the next few years alongside using it I want to gradually get it to 1st class condition. I messed with LRs 15 yr ago but on a shoestring and nothing was done right. This time I want to do it properly.

    I guess my plan is to do a bit at a time, as things need attention and as time allows. It already has a galvanised chassis and the bulkhead is sound. Engine seems fine and the head was skimmed 3 years ago. The only real issue so far is the clutch is dragging in first and reverse.

    One thing I thought would be worth doing is every time I take something to bits, replace all the fixings with stainless steel as I rebuild. One less thing to corrode. Can anyone recommend a kit of stainless steel fixings? Is this even worth doing?

    Does anyone have any other pearls of wisdom / things to think about / words of advice before I begin?
     
  2. rob1miles

    rob1miles Well-Known Member

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    Beware stainless, it can be weak if its not the right grade, pick up on the threads (galls) something rotten and corrodes (mildly) when in contact with aluminium and work hardens. LR got this one right with zinc plated steel, which is why the original fixings have lasted so well. I do use some SS fixings on bits I've added and with a bit of sealer or a plastic washer they are fine, but don't replace any important fixings with SS.
     
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  3. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

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    I've never really understood the facination for stainless fasteners unless they are part of trim on show, such as motorbike fairings. Decent quality fasteners with a smear of grease should last many years and will probably outlive the average landy owner. However, welcome to Landyzone and don't be shy of posting pics of your pride and joy.

    Col
     
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  4. kermit_rr

    kermit_rr Can't Remember Full Member

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    If the clutch is dragging, there could be air in the system or it might need the pushrod adjusting
    Don't bother with stainless :)
     
  5. tottot

    tottot Well-Known Member

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    For the clutch, first make sure no air in system as others have said. The push rod that can be adjusted is the one at the brake pedal. [ must be done right as in the book ] to much and brake can stick on. The clutch slave push rod can wear over time [ long time ] getting shorter resulting in less movement. Replace is only answer.
    The only place I like stainless is the floor and wing fixings clips [ with grease ]
     
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  6. Marmaduke

    Marmaduke Well-Known Member

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    These are both 8.8 stainless
    20210411_183756.jpg
    20210410_171501.jpg
     
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  7. Disco1BFG

    Disco1BFG Well-Known Member Full Member

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    +1 - it's pretty - so it could burn you !!:D

    Also, +1.

    OP:- IMO, consider most fixings as consumable - use new BZP fittings, grease them on fitting and forget them till next time....

    Any fixings which "argue" - just destroy them and replace with new - it really is not worth the time....

    Best way I have found is to get yourself some dremel speed click cutting discs with the correct mandrel .... and a die grinder to spin them with .... IMO, whilst the Dremel attachments are good, I've had poor service from their actual grinders, and now consider even the cheapo ones off eblag ( etc. ) as consumables ...

    Worth reading:- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galvanic_series

    :)
     
  8. VictorVictor

    VictorVictor New Member

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    Thanks everyone that's all really helpful. Hoping to sort the clutch tomorrow. First job check slave and master boots for fluid leakage then check fluid level, top up if needed and bleed and go from there. On fixings, extremely helpful... so what I plan to do is get an assortment of BZP fixings (like this https://www.wrightsautosupplies.co....h-tensile-8-8-grade-bzp-restoration-pack-unf/) and always reassemble with new. Thread-lock compound. Should you use it? Or just all purpose grease?
     
  9. lynall

    lynall Well-Known Member Full Member

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    It is quite common on the series motors to have to extend the clutch slave pushrod to get the clutch to clear nicely, there are so many parts in the system that a kantts cock of wear on each part means it will not function as designed.
    But as the the car is new to you, you cannot just fixate on one part of the system you will have to check each part you can get access to.

    Stainless is fine so long as you grease it, same as normal bolts, and no need for thread locker unless the part keeps coming loose.
    The bonu with stainless is in things like front panel to wings/floor plates to bulkhead, as you can undo them after years and easily remove them.

    The original bolts were Sheradised rather than galved, you can get sheradised bolt/nut kits, but they are eye wateringly expensive!

    http://www.landrover-parts.net/products.php?cat=4
     
  10. VictorVictor

    VictorVictor New Member

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    Should ALL bolt threads be greased before reassembly? With a multipurpose lithium grease? Or a Copper grease?
     
  11. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't really matter which grease you use but copper grease is best for parts that might get hot.

    Col
     
  12. Blackburn

    Blackburn Well-Known Member

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    Copper grease is an anti seize product ideal for bolts that are going to be left a longtime before being undone again.
    Colliery shaft men used to use it on cage winding gear which was exposed mineral loaded water .
    Had a tub from pit which is now used up the replacement copper grease I bought seems to be a bit lighter.
     
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  13. VictorVictor

    VictorVictor New Member

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    Thanks all. This dragging clutch is driving me mad. Fluid reservoir full and slave pushrod pushing fine with minimal free play in the system. Transfer box goes from low to high fine with engine running but main box stuck in 1st. A little bit of oily fluid on the slave push rod as it moves, but hard to tell if it's grime or clutch fluid. Might it be something in the gearbox? Or should I replace the slave cylinder?
     
  14. Marmaduke

    Marmaduke Well-Known Member

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    For how much they cos you might as well replace it then you can discount it from the equation
     
  15. VictorVictor

    VictorVictor New Member

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    So I took the floor up to better see what was going on, and access the slave and noticed the hinge on the reverse gate was broken and it was blocking moving out of first. Nothing to do with the clutch, but same symptom.

    While in there I want to thoroughly clean up the exposed bits. Anything to watch out for? Is it safe to clean everything down there with degreaser and water?
     

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  16. Blackburn

    Blackburn Well-Known Member

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    It is worth taking the cover off the ends of high low selector shafts and oiling them up whilst you have the floor up. Check the tin cover as they tend to rust through.
     

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