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Freelander 1 Removing bearing race from hub flange

Discussion in 'Land Rover Freelander' started by andyfreelandy, Jun 26, 2020.

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  1. andyfreelandy

    andyfreelandy Well-Known Member

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    OK so I cut most way through it with a disc cutter and then smack it with a cold chisel to break it.

    Anyone got a less stressful way of removing. The bearing race is so tight to the wheel hub flange that you can't part it.

    Have a puller but there is no gap!!

    Thanks
     
  2. andyfreelandy

    andyfreelandy Well-Known Member

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    Found this. Going to try it. Looks hopeful for the F 1 hubs too.
     
  3. Nodge68

    Nodge68 Well-Known Member

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    Heat is your friend.;)

    Heat the race with a large propane torch, preferably oxy-acetylene flame. The heat will expand the bearing race, allowing you to tap a sharp cold chisel behind it to get it off.

    I have had to cut them off before now, which isn't as heard as it sounds. To to split it with a cold chisel, you need to hit it hard enough to crack the race.;)
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2020
  4. Kev12

    Kev12 Well-Known Member

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    A puller like the one above is on my wish list but have always managed by grinding a flat on one side to its wafer thin then splitting with a chisel. I find grinding it down reduces the chance of damaging anything else compared ti a cutting disc
     
  5. guineafowl21

    guineafowl21 Well-Known Member

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    If t didn’t crack straight away, you didn’t cut it enough or didn’t hit it hard enough. Don’t fret about cutting slightly into the hub spindle, either.
     
    Nodge68 likes this.
  6. Jayridium

    Jayridium Well-Known Member

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    I was actually going to suggest this very method... Grind a flat down close to the spindle, then put a flap disc on it for the last little bit. With the grinding you are putting heat into the race, and making it to remove, by thinning down the flat, you are creating a weak spot in the bearing, once ground down a two-legged puller or a hammer and chisel will take it off.
     
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