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Radiator bracket repair

Discussion in 'Series Land Rovers' started by Bern, Apr 17, 2019.

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  1. Bern

    Bern Member

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    On to the next problem!!!

    The steel bracket around the radiator has come detatched from the copper header and base on one side of the radiator.

    What's the best way to fix it, apart from that the radiator looks good so I'd like to fix it rather than buy another?

    I thought about trying to solder it, but open to suggestions.

    Cheers.
     
  2. marjon

    marjon Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like that was originally soldered from your description, pic might help.

    But if that is the case then yes I would go with the solder option.

    J
     
  3. Bern

    Bern Member

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    Looks like it was originally soldered:

    DSC_1031.JPG
     
  4. Bobsticle

    Bobsticle De Villes Advocaat

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    If it was soldered it would be silver and look like it had flowed without the bubbles. Same with brazing but yellow.
    That looks like a later bodge with epoxy.
    I dunt know the answer but probably either brazed or spot welded.
     
  5. marjon

    marjon Well-Known Member

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    As^^^
    Looks like a later repair(bodge).

    That stuff needs to come off either way before you decide what way to go.

    J
     
  6. Bern

    Bern Member

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    Maybe it's that chemical metal stuff. I'll clean it off and then try soldering it. I guess brazing would be better, but I've only got a small plumbing blowlamp.
     
  7. tottot

    tottot Well-Known Member

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    Solder is the usual way, your blowlamp should be fine. Leaded solder if you can get some and a good flux.
     
  8. steve2286w

    steve2286w Active Member

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    I’d be wary of putting too much heat in and melting the solder on other side holding fins in. I’d do the expoxy type repair
     
  9. rob1miles

    rob1miles Well-Known Member

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    Its soldered but you need to be careful. Get it very clean, acid flux and lead solder. A big blowlanp as it will soak up heat and have a water spray bottle to chill the bits you don't want melting. I would also wire the core and end cap just in case, then if the solder melts a bit it won't fall apart. I've soldered a a few radiators and repaired drain plugs and conenctions, its OK but you need to get the heat in fast, do it and stop before the heat soaks to places you don't want to melt. If the flame is too small by the time the bit you want to melt does everything esle is ready to melt too.
     
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  10. Blackburn

    Blackburn Well-Known Member

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    I would try tiger seal as long as you can clamp it in place long enough to allow it to set.
     
  11. Bern

    Bern Member

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    That sounds safer, will it stand up to the heat though?
     
  12. Land Raver

    Land Raver Well-Known Member

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    JB Weld will be fit for purpose. Withstands very high temps.
     
  13. Bern

    Bern Member

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    Nice, I have some JB Weld somewhere!
     
  14. Bobsticle

    Bobsticle De Villes Advocaat

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    It may be fixed before the fins are soldered into place so heat wouldn’t be a factor when manufactured.
    I’d go with adhesive of some sort but clean it to bare metal and provide a key.
     
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