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Something draining battery

Discussion in 'Defender 90 / 110 / 130' started by Landlover99, Apr 7, 2015.

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  1. Landlover99

    Landlover99 Active Member

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    Hi all, My 2003 TD5 is consuming 300mA when when everything is turned off. This level of quiescent current may not sound much, but if I leave the vehicle standing for a week or so, there's typically not enough grunt in the battery to spin the starter over. And this is a recent HD battery in good nick and there's nothing wrong with the charging system. Just wondering what others are experiencing in terms of current drain when the vehicle is just standing and which sub-circuit might be most likely responsible? I suppose I could install a batter isolator switch, but decent ones for the required level of current (esp. during starting) don't come cheap! thanks.
     
  2. richard_paradox

    richard_paradox Active Member

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    get a multi meter with a clamp for current or use the current setting and place in line on the positive of the battery (only use low power items)

    then remove fuses one by one until the power draw drops should help narrow down the fault to a particular circuit
     
  3. mrchurchill109

    mrchurchill109 Active Member

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    First place I might check is the alternator - which can still charge and function with a leaky/dodgy diode (which can cause the exact symptoms you mention).

    Barring that the ammeter in line with the battery positive and yanking the fuses is a good idea.
     
  4. Landlover99

    Landlover99 Active Member

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    Hmmm. Not sure how easy it is to get to the alternator. I might actually check that last rather than first if it's a bitch to get at. But thanks for the tip; I hadn't considered that. I
     
  5. Landlover99

    Landlover99 Active Member

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    Yes, good suggestion. But why a clamp meter? We're not talking high currents here. If anyone knows what the normal quiescent current is for a TD5, then that would be useful to know. I can only think of the alarm/immobiliser that would remain live when all else is shut down, but 300mA seems very high for that purpose.
     
  6. mrchurchill109

    mrchurchill109 Active Member

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    You don't need to completely remove itt from the car to test this - simply electrically isolating it will do. This doesn't need to get done at the alternator - it can be done upstream at any convenient connection.

    Just a thought. :p

    Alan
     
  7. Brown

    Brown Well-Known Member

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    The wiring looms on TD5s can malfunction and yield current drains. I had one around Christmas that turned out to be something wrong with the pink and brown wire which goes from the fuse box under the drivers seat to the bulkhead. You should be getting less than 300 mA. There'll be a little drain to keep the alarm and immobiliser alive (and the little red light on) but I'd guess that a fully charged battery in situ should be able to hold charge for around 3 or 4 weeks ideally rather than just one.
     
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