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A riveting question

Discussion in 'Series Land Rovers' started by BaldRick84, Jun 25, 2020.

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  1. BaldRick84

    BaldRick84 New Member

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    Hello all,

    I'm repainting my SWB 88" truck and will be reinstating the capping afterwards.
    A few novice/primitive questions regarding the correct rivets to use...
    Attached are a couple of pictures of what is on my truck right now and the diagram from the parts manual.

    1) The manual shows 78248 (described as a 35mm pop rivet, which I've ordered) to use on the top of the cappings, but doesn't show what should go in the side of the capping. Have searched around but can't find the answer I'm looking for. Should I use 78248 for the sides too? (My truck is post-1980, so am I correct in thinking pop rivets were used from new, as opposed to dome headed ones?)

    2) The manual shows the rear light clusters using rivets 78248 and 78885. If 3 x 78885 each side, in which 'oles do they go in? Is length the only difference between them? What's on the truck now is not a great guide as to what should be there.

    3) The three dome headed rivets above each wheel arch that secure the wing skin to the box inside - mine have been sanded down through other peoples previous efforts. Again, can't find any reference to these online or in the parts manual. Bits4Landys have four dome headed varieties on this page, which of these are best suited, if any? https://www.bits4landys.co.uk/rivets/series2-s3.htm

    4) Finally, I tried a riveter (the hand held plier type) but so hard to use. I'm not going to splurge on an air riveter or compressor for one set of cappings. Was looking at this Lazy Tongue from Screwfix. Can anyone recommend them? https://www.screwfix.com/p/lazy-tongue-riveter/10461

    Thanks for any info :)
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Britcyclerider

    Britcyclerider Active Member

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    I've been using the Screwfix riveter you describe for a few years now and I think it is great, particularly when using stainless shank rivets. I used to reallu ache after a few "pops" of the only squeexe handled riveter.

    When replacing my cappings, I just bought a pack of closed head rivets from eBay- aluminium with stanless shank. Seemed to be just fine.

    This might help: https://www.bits4landys.co.uk/rivets/rivets-tools.htm
     
    raywin likes this.
  3. rob1miles

    rob1miles Well-Known Member

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    I use Lazy Tongs, (Tongue ? Can't they get the staff?). Toolstation are good for rivets, lots of sizes.
     
    Disco1BFG likes this.
  4. ciderman

    ciderman Active Member

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    I had 2 of these riveters- superb. Until my mate took it apart to see how it worked---- now I have one.
     
  5. miktdish

    miktdish Well-Known Member

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    Can't help with the rivet types (sorry) but I do have one of those Lazy T riveters. They are good, if you have the room. You do tend to push down with a bit of force too and when the rivet 'pops' the tool will skid off sideways so a bit of masking tape is advisable to stop you scratching the paint. I've just fitted a rear-bulkhead removal bar and it was a good tool for the 4.8mm rivets used but I have also rebuilt my heater-box and the Lazy T was far too large and heavy for the 3mm rivets used to reassemble. I borrowed a normal hand-squeeze gun for that job.
     
    raywin likes this.
  6. Beneagles

    Beneagles Well-Known Member

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  7. TheMegaMan

    TheMegaMan Active Member

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    If you need an excuse to get a compressor, an air riveter is an excellent tool. Very satisfying to use, and obviously a doddle to do lots of rivets, very cleanly, and little risk of paintwork damage. You can focus on getting the rivet in the right place and not worry about applying the force. But yes, a little expensive if you don't intend to do many.
     
  8. rob1miles

    rob1miles Well-Known Member

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    The trick with the lazy tongs is to push hard at the start then pull the business end when its close to breaking so it doesn't bounce. You can also wrap some duct tape round it..
     
  9. RP72

    RP72 Member

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    Just a thought, if you have plenty of access to the rivets, might be worth trying one of these:

    https://www.sealey.co.uk/product/5637706740/riveter-adaptor-drill-powered

    I bought one as have a bit of arthritis in my hands and can't use the plier type for long.
    Was a bit sceptical, to be honest, but it works a treat. Can get them cheaper on ebay - I paid about £25.
     
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  10. raywin

    raywin Well-Known Member

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    I bought a compressed air one from lidle when they had air tools on offer.
    It doesn't half save some arm aches.
    As suggested above get blind rivets from e bay.
    I bought some rivets from screwfix but several of them snapped off leaving a spike still sticking out.
     
  11. rob1miles

    rob1miles Well-Known Member

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    That's neat, never seen those, and you could use an angle drill too.

    Re rivets breaking, I had that problem and found the cheap rivets are very sensitive to the adjustment on the rivetter head.
     
  12. Bobsticle

    Bobsticle De Villes Advocaat

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    I’m tight so used a g cramp to push the handles together on mi cheapo riviter.

    only needed to do this once on some uge rivets keeping mi wings on :oops:
     
  13. BaldRick84

    BaldRick84 New Member

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    Thanks for the responses. I bought the Lazy Tong, seems much easier than the plier type! Just need a bit of practice to stop it bouncing.

    Here's an unrelated Q: - refurbishing my beatbox and re attaching the underseat battery box - what's the "correct" look for the rivets? Bare or sprayed in situ with the rest of the seatbox? How would it have left the factory?
     
  14. rob1miles

    rob1miles Well-Known Member

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    Painted. Mine is ex army so everything is painted twice, once by LR and then again with squaddy and brush. The original rivets are painted. My seatbox looks orginal so I'm confident of that answer.
     
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