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1965 Series 2a Station Wagon in Holland

Discussion in 'Members Vehicles/Projects' started by Stretch, Mar 18, 2016.

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  1. Stretch

    Stretch Well-Known Member

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    It is indeed a bit of a beast.

    In better economic times it would have been high time for a classic tractor =>

    Moving the big stump.jpg

    The concrete tiles weigh about 35 each - there's 19 of those buggers (~650kg) providing an anchor for the hand winch - the friction of the stump on the block paving required some counter-acting help from a trolley jack to stop the anchor from being dragged towards the stump...

    ...if only I'd finished the Land Rover. If only I'd won the lottery. If only...

    ...oh **** it - it'll come good in the end - take me forever - but it'll come good in the end
     
  2. Colthebrummie

    Colthebrummie Well-Known Member

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    I love your optimism and perseverance.

    Col
     
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  3. LincolnSteve

    LincolnSteve Well-Known Member

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    It would be no fun if it was too easy. ;)

    Keep going!
     
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  4. Stretch

    Stretch Well-Known Member

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    (Still only vaguely related to Land Rovers)

    Workshop update =>

    Having hacked and shredded and dug out loads of organic matter I managed to remember to fit in the drains for the gutters before I started to raise the ground level!

    Building new workshop1.jpg

    For raising the ground level I've used a special type of sand that the Dutch call "Woudzand". This translates directly to forest sand which to the average English person I'm sure means diddly squat. The first time I saw "the Dutch" using this stuff I was on a train leaving Utrecht where they were building embankments and flyovers for the trains (this was years ago now). At the time I thought - haven't they read the bible here? Don't build on shifting sands you effing numpties...

    ...anyway having now seen the stuff up close (and being convinced that it'll work) I can see why this stuff is the dog's doo daahs. It feels like it is closer to being a granulated clay rather than a sand. Once compacted it is pretty water resistant (although total saturation would start to get a bit tricky). So a bit of water management will be needed - but hey I understand I'm in the right country for that.

    After shifting about 100 cubic meters of woudzand (and compacting as I went) =>

    Building new workshop2.jpg

    I built an edge to a tray for holding (railway) ballast in place.

    ########

    A bit of a design "aside"

    I'm on the edge of an earthquake zone here. It isn't San Andreas fault type earthquakes round 'ere - low lever(er) stuff (Max Richter Scale so far about 3 - but not that bad where I am) caused by extracting too much gas out of the ground (apparently / allegedly / depends who you speak to / bit of a sore point / best not mention it too much!). Anyway I thought a conventional (reinforced steel) concrete structure on top of raised ground in the event of an earthquake might prove to be a bit of a pain in the arse if it slides off or tilts at an awkward angle. So I reckoned I needed to come up with a plan; that whilst in the event of an earthquake which would definitely be a pain in the arse; I reckoned something a little bit like a shipping container that you can jack up and re-level would be ideal...

    ...also having looked at the cost of concrete structures and thinking about residual end of life material values I kind of thought concrete isn't a great deal even though most people think it is "cheap"...

    ...getting even one ISO / shipping container on site here would be silly expensive as a mega crane would be needed to lift it over houses and roads would have to be closed so I've decided to build my own steel structure equivalent of a shipping container instead.

    The basic design is simple

    100 cubic meters of woudzand (about 150 tons)
    16 cubic meters of ballast (about 28 tons)
    41 railway sleepers (about 80kg each)
    IPE steel beams and lots of box section

    Biggest welding project I've ever done!

    #########

    Membranes used under and on top of the woudzand so hopefully I won't be boring you with woes about weeds growing through my workshop (!)

    Building new workshop3.jpg

    Ready for the railway sleepers (not here yet)

    Building new workshop4.jpg

    Got to go and try and get a good deal on the steel now.

    To be continued.
     
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  5. Stretch

    Stretch Well-Known Member

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    Workshop update:-

    Workshop ready for welding1.jpg

    Workshop ready for welding2.jpg

    This is going to be the biggest welding project so far (even worse than that pesky S2a I've got!)

    #########

    Boring aside mild steel vs wood

    The down side to making stud walls from steel box sections will certainly be the amount of welding I'll be doing as well as figuring out a way of fixing sheet materials (such as plywood or OSB) to the frame - however the upside will certainly be strength. There is also a noticeable cost benefit.

    (I could possibly have gotten a better deal in a different part of the country where there's a bit more competition - but even so)

    100 X 50 X 3mm mild steel seam welded box section cost me 5 euros (ex VAT) per meter - similar sized soft wood is about the same price here

    100 X 100 X 3mm mild steel seam welded box section cost me 6.75 euros (ex VAT) per meter - no flipping way that would be under 10 euros a meter

    I really wanted to build an oak framed wattle and daub building (still do) but for a 9 meter X 7.5 meter floor area the material costs were mental.

    So all in all I'm happy to have chosen steel for building a frame structure at the moment - not sure if you should ask me in a few weeks after I've been burning my way through meters of 6013 welding rods!
     
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