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Freelander 1 Sticking NSF brake caliper

Discussion in 'Land Rover Freelander' started by rob_bell, Apr 22, 2017.

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  1. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    Agh! Front passenger caliper has seized. :(

    Just took it apart. Sliders are fine. Piston dust shield seems okay too. But the piston isn't moving freely.

    Just purchased a caliper off eBay for £40 and will see how that goes.

    Never has a seized caliper before: I'll do a post mortem when it's off the car. I suspect the piston must have corroded?

    I've bought one. Now wondering whether I should buy an OS one as well...?
     
  2. guineafowl21

    guineafowl21 Well-Known Member

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    Generally better to replace these things in pairs. It may be wise to buy a couple of flexi hoses as well, since you often can't undo the unions without damaging everything. Copper grease the unions and bleed nipple threads when you fit the new ones. When you open the system, jam the brake pedal down with a piece of wood and there'll be no drips. After finishing, open both new nipples, top up the master cyl, and go have a cup of tea. Once the fluid is dripping freely, close up and you will have a much easier time bleeding.

    I've just replaced both front calipers and hoses and ended up having to run a new OS brake pipe back to the ABS unit.

    The piston will have corroded (and the bore) and probably damaged the main seal as well. Another possibility is the flexi hose collapsing internally and acting like a one-way valve - another good reason to replace them.
     
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  3. Nodge68

    Nodge68 Well-Known Member

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    Just been out today in the wife's BMW E46 vert. I noticed the OS front disc is squealing softly to itself and feels hotter than it should. Looks like some investigation is needed on that to. It's obviously the time of year for sticking calipers. :(
     
  4. Speckydude

    Speckydude Well-Known Member

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    Yup, I have some investigations to preform on that score.
     
  5. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    Thanks: good advice, thanks! Hadn't considered placing the flexi (looks fine externally), but will check this out on the bay of fleas...
     
  6. andyfreelandy

    andyfreelandy Well-Known Member

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    Tis certainly the 'season to be sticky'. My MOT advisory was that pads worn on one side ! Immediately I checked it all over and the one caliper does not return easily and one side stays warm. Taking car out for a decent run and not using brakes proves a rubbing disc.
    Changes the caliper and all fine. Pipes unscrewed no problems. Replaced pads as a matter of course due to probably overheating one side and damaging the material. It was very glazed.
     
  7. andyfreelandy

    andyfreelandy Well-Known Member

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    Stick on anti-squeel backing material solved my forever squealing front pads !
     
  8. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    Job done! New NSF caliper fitted, and sticking be gone! :D

    image.jpeg

    Pretty easy to do:

    1. Remove road wheel after securely hacking up corner of car
    2. Undo and remove clipper slider retaining screws (and put in a safe place)
    3. Remove the sticking calipe: easier said than done if it is griping the pads in a vice-like death grip. A wood face hammer and some brute-force ignorance did the job :)
    4. Swing caliper up and out of the way and fit the new caliper to the carrier.
    5. Fit a new copper brake hose washer to the new caliper.
    6. Wire brush clean the brake Union to caliper and remove the banjo joint to the caliper.
    7. Discard old sealing washers wand replace with new.
    8. Attach the brake pipe Union to the caliper and tighten to correct torque.
    9. Bleed brakes and top up brake reservoir.
    10. Just drive and job done :D
     
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  9. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    Just started the battle to replace both the OSF lower wishbone and the ABS sensor.

    On removing the brake caliper, I found this:

    image.jpeg

    The rubber piston seal has seen better days. Although not sticking (yet) I've got a replacement on order...
     
  10. Nodge68

    Nodge68 Well-Known Member

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    Not uncommon on a 10 year + car. A rebuild kit is cheap, but a replacement caliper is easier;)
     
  11. rob_bell

    rob_bell Well-Known Member

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    I thought about a rebuild kit, but as the other caliper had already seized, I reckoned that a replacement would likely be both easier and more reliable in the longer term :)
     
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