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Disco 2 Inlet Manifold Removal & Clean + Re-furbish FPR

Discussion in 'Land Rover Discovery' started by Intestinalworm, Feb 24, 2018.

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  1. Intestinalworm

    Intestinalworm Active Member

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    Just after some advice and tips if anyone cares to share their triumphs:D and/or frustrations :mad: related to the FPR and the inlet manifold. I recently confirmed the FPR was leaking slightly (original FPR - 15 years old) and, after recently removing the EGR, I noticed that the inlet manifold was dirty, as you'd expect, but not overly so - thin film more than caked on.

    It's a 2003 Disco 2 Td5 - with the EU3 FPR (3 hoses).

    Objective #1 (primary objective) - Remove, re-furbish and replace FPR (I have a kit from X8R with the 4 bar Bosch pressure regulator, O-ring seals for three pipes, O-ring seal to engine block, and the correct metal gasket (MSX000010)).

    Objective #2 (optional objective - clean manifold and also make FPR removal easier) - Remove and clean inlet manifold and replace with new gasket.

    I like to have a look at what I'm going to do first as I have fairly limited tools and only basic experience, with that end I have looked at:

    http://www.discovery2.co.uk/Fpr.html
    (Great tutorial by "Urban Panzer" for FPR replacement, but he's replacing the two-pipe model)


    (This was a very comprehensive Youtube video tutorial and also described the three-pipe model)


    (Another good Youtube video tutorial by Alec McLeod)

    Okay, shouldn't be too hard, but few issues:

    1. Worth taking the bonnet off for better access and light?
    2. Do I need to use a brake line (crow foot / flared bit) 3/8" 14mm bit for the top fuel line? Worried that a standard 14mm open ended spanner might damage the nut on the fuel line? Also notice that access makes using a spanner problematic here (heater hoses really get in the way).
    3. Will removing the inlet manifold make a difference (apart from being able to clean it) considering how involved it might be taking that off as well? Pretty cramped with that bloody fuel cooler as well.
    4. Don't have a suitable torque wrench (the one I have is 1/2") that would allow access when tightening up the three 10mm bolts to 25Nm. That's not a major hassle is it - just don't want to crush the metal gasket.
    5. Any other tips worth sharing that could save me some frustration?
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
  2. Nick666

    Nick666 Active Member

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    The Defender one's similar enough I feel I can comment ;)
    1) Dunno how hard the Disco bonnet is to remove, but if it's not a MAJOR pain in the something, I'd do it. Everything's easier without the damn things in the way.
    2) No. A standard spanner is fine (for the nut anyway) - they're just 'nipped' up so you're not going to put major strain on it.
    3) No idea about this one admittedly. Not heard about cleaning the manifold really having much effect unless it's absolutely disgusting. Fixings should be easy enough given it doesn't get hot like the exhaust manifold though... I doubt it's necessary just to do the FPR though, certainly isn't for the Defender.
    4) Not ideal of course, but the key here is to do them all up evenly to balance out the pressure. I think I'd want to have a torque wrench. Could you borrow one?
    5) Worth buying a spare gasket btw, this one's a bit of a pain esp that bottom bolt. You may find you get it all on and it still weeps a bit, if you haven't done it all up just right. Found getting the top two bolts in really loose first, to line the thing up, then the bottom one, because you can't really see where it's got to go, and hidden underneath, was the best solution for me. Holding the gasket in place while doing that is a bit tricky, someone suggested a bit of grease to tack it onto either the engine or the FPR helps, I found that didn't work that well, but holding it on over the tips of the two top bolts, then putting the bolts in just a couple turns worked in the end.
    The ideal is to take the wing off as the angle's all wrong for convenience, but it is doable with patience.
    Check for weeping after.
     
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  3. joojar

    joojar Active Member

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    Did same thing last year: https://www.landyzone.co.uk/posts/4015040/

    "Highlights" -
    - fuel cooler was an absolute b***er to get reattached to inlet manifold. Bottom bolt being the culprit
    - quite a few inlet manifold fixings were loose (which explained the oily slick down that side of the engine)
     
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  4. joojar

    joojar Active Member

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    Oh, and I didn't remove the bonnet. Doesn't get in the way at all
     
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  5. Hellastony

    Hellastony Active Member

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    You don't need to remove the bonnet, nor do you need to remove all the connections to the FPR, only the quick release onto the pipe on top of the fuel cooler, best done with a small open end spanner through the space above the fuel cooler and push against the clip, it compresses, and pull the pipe off the back at the same time. You will get the hang of it when you do it. The other connection is the again, quick release onto the FPR housing itself, there is no need to remove all of the screwed in connections, only the additional hose to the head that you have on the EU3 engine. But there is no need, unless they are leaking, to remove the other connections to replace the little o rings, even once the FPR is off. Remove the electrical connection from the temperature sensor.
    There are three bolts holding the FPR to the block, you need to be double jointed and with a selection of wobble extensions and sockets to get to the bolts. On a LHD it is fairly easy to get to all three from the top. On a RHD, you may find it easier to get to the bottom bolt from underneath. Then just wiggle the FPR out complete through the top. Remove the old regulator, you will need a pair of circlip pliers to do this, replace with new. If it has a short pipe coming out of it, orientate it roughly to stop it hitting the block when you replace it, it should be pointing down ideally, many put a piece of suitable pipe on it for ease of seeing if it is leaking in the future. Then carefully remove the little O ring still hopefully stuck to the block underneath the FPR. As you remove it a small fragile tubular gauze filter will come out from underneath it from inside the block. Carefully clean this in diesel or brake cleaner and replace with a new O ring to hold it in. Assuming you got the kit from somewhere like Phil Stuart on ebay, you will have the new O ring. Then replace all three bolts in there respective holes in the FPR housing, place the gasket over them and then place a suitable size thin rubber band around the ends of the three bolts to, a) hold the bolts in position, so they don't fall out, and b) to stop the gasket falling off as you put the FPR back on the block. Then get all three bolts to just catch, pull the rubber band to break it, making sure you have got it all out, and tighten carefully all three bolts to correct torque. Replace the electrical connection to the temperature sensor, replace the two fuel lines, they just push on until they clip. Then purge the system correctly by quickly pumping the throttle pedal five times, with the ignition on until the red engine warning light comes on, and you should hear the pump working. Wait until it has finished 3-5 mins and then it should start. If not purge again. The whilst running get underneath and with a light make sure the FPR is not leaking any more. Fiddly but not difficult job, I did two LHD's in one and half hours not long ago.....

    I thinks that all IIRC.

    There is a good write up here
    http://www.discovery2.co.uk/Fpr.html

    Unless your inlet manifold is VERY dirty I wouldn't bother cleaning it out, as once the EGR is off, it will get less dirty anyway. If you decide to take it off then of course clean it, but although they are generally oily it does not harm performance IMO, but do make sure the MAP sensor is clean.

    Tony
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
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