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LandyZone - Land Rover Forum

 
Sep
10
Rust Removal Using Electrolysis
Introduction To The Electrolysis Of Rust

For some time I have had a need to be able to carefully remove rust from steel and iron artifacts and this page came into being as a result of my experiments into trying to achieve just this. I give a respectful nod to the various rust removal pages that were in existence before this one, and to which I was able to refer in the early years whilst doing my initial research; Some of those sites had ommitted detail which I felt the experimenter may need to be aware of, hence my decision to publicise my experiences and try to answer all questions I had.
There are various obvious methods of rust removal, but these methods are unsuitable for very old or valuable artifacts as they tend to be destructive in use, meaning that along with the rust some of the base metal is also removed. Dissolving the rust with acids such as phosphoric acid or even vinegar can produce good results, but this process removes any surface features which may have been preserved in the rust. As I required a way of actually trying to salvage some of the rusted metal rather than just removing or dissolving it, these methods were considered inappropriate. This left the electrolytic method, also known as electrolysis, which involves using the passage of an electric current in an alkaline solution, or electrolyte, to do the job of trying to reconvert some of the corrosion products back into sound iron, whilst loosening the remaining corrosion by converting it to a loosely bound compound.
Please note that electrolytic cleaning is not suitable for non-ferrous metals such as copper, bronze, brass, pewter, tin or aluminium. The corrosion products found on these metals is rarely formed by electrolytic action and therefore the process cannot be reversed electrolytically. In the case of copper and tin alloys the treatment would be harmless, although aluminium could be adversely affected by the...
Aug
28
Doe's any one know if mixing different types of antifreeze causes the antifreeze to gel?
Aug
06
Hopefully you already know that to charge the leisure battery at the same time as the vehicles alternator is charging the starter battery, the simplest option is to connect a wire between the 2 batteries positive terminals, and to ensure that the leisure battery is separated from the starter battery when the engine is not running, you put a switch in that wire, and to do it automatically you can use a relay connected to an ignition switched source, a better way is to use the alternator to trigger the relay so it is only activated when the alternator is actually charging.

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You've probably seen this picture before from the manual switch wiring, it's here with the relay drawn in to show the basics of the split charge systems, all split charge systems have a few things in common, they are.. the leisure battery needs it's negative terminal connected to the vans chassis earth.. the same as the starter battery is wired.. this is to ensure the charge going to the leisure battery gets back to the alternator who's earth is connected to the van's metalwork.. called chassis earth.

You also have a wire from both positive terminals that go to a convenient location where you'll be putting the switch of your choice.. in the case of a manual switch, then the wires would go to where ever you mount the switch.. usually near the dashboard, but the relay can go almost anywhere convenient, it can live near one of the batteries (usually the starter battery for convenience in connecting the relays trigger wire to the alternator or other engine trigger point) but it can go in the middle of the wire if you really wanted it to, just depends on the route you've taken to run the wires from the 2 batteries so they meet at a common location.

And the most important bit, there must be a fuse at the connection to each batteries positive terminal.

The actual wire size you choose to use is largely upto you, but bear in mind voltage...
Aug
05
Disco II Air suspension – the definitive guide!
It's about time someone put all this into one place... so here it is!

All you will ever need to know about Air Suspension.


Simply put, the air suspension on the disco II consists of a couple of balloons at each back wheel.
A way of inflating them independently and a computer to monitor the height of the car and keep it all level.


The Disco II air suspension consists of the following components:

  • Air bags (balloons)
  • Pipes that join the air bags to the valve block and supply air to the compressor
  • A valve block to control independent inflation/deflation of the air bags
  • A compressor to supply compressed air
  • Air scrubbers/filters to clean and de-moisturise the air
  • Ride height sensors to feedback levelling and height information to the computer
  • A computer to control the valve operation and activation of the compressor

Component Locations:

  • Air bags:There are two air bags, one at each back wheel (there is no air suspension on the front)
  • Air Pipes: the supply air to the compressor runs along the chassis to the compressor from behind...
Jul
28
Fitting a turbo gauge.


... the easy way;) :D

This is how ah did it...
Took the pipe from the wastgate off (this piccy shows the one on the other bus that was already cut and a tee piece put in place)...

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Cut a small section of fuel pipe that ah had handy and stuck it on the tee piece....

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Ah just happened to have an old Goodridge motorbike brake pipe kickin' around, so ah cut off the banjo ends...

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and stuck it into the bit of fuel pipe...

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Next ah took off the fuse holder ...

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and poked the pipe through where the main wiring loom comes in...

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then ah stuck it through the channel that the wires go up to the middle of the dash...

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Then ah took the fittings off this end of the pipe as the internal diameter was perfect for the gauge and stuck another piece of fuel line over the top to secure it with a clamp....

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That's pretty much it apart from wirin' in the light which was pretty easy;) red wire from gauge goes into a red/white wire and the black goes into a black one.
Job done;) :D
Jul
16
So you want to install a second battery to power your winch, CB, fridge, inverter, camping stuff etc...
  • you want to isolate the battery so you can run it flat?
  • you want to recharge it when the engines running?
  • you dont wanna be stranded with a flat starter battery on a mountain after your camping trip?
  • you want it all to be automatic?
you'll need a split charge circuit...

this link gives good information.
a split charge circuit can be made for just a few quid...

Split Charge Circuits - MarcleLeisure.co.uk
Jul
08
Renewing the UJ's

here's how ah did it.....

First ah undid and took off the propshaft.....

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(in the piccy above ah used a 14mm spanner on this particular nut, be aware that they're mostly 9/16" )

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then took off the circlips on top of the cups.....

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then usin' an old socket and a hammer, ah knocked the uj down until the bottom cup fell through and there was enough room to get the top cup out....

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and did the same again to finaly remove the uj (sat it on a bigger socket to stop it bouncin' around when ah was hittin' it)....

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the old and the new uj's....

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Refittig..
took the cups off and the seals, packed the cups with grease to stop the needle rollers from falling over and then pushed a cup into the yoke...

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then ah put the seals onto the uj and pushed it into the cup (being very carefull not to knock any needle roller over)....

then ah stuck the other cap on and using a vice and a nut, ah pushed the cups home (again being very carefull not to knock the rollers over)....

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Jun
29
Manifold removal


Here's how ah did it.....

The engine...

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First ah removed the hose from the air filter to the turbo...

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then ah took the hose off the bottom of the the turbo...

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then unbolted the oil feed pipe from the top of the turbo and where it bolts on down below......

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...and moved it to one side.

Next ah took off the boost pressure pipe from the turbo....

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...and moved that out of the way as well.

Then ah disconnected the front exhaust pipe....

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and moved it out of the way...

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then back under the bus to release the oil drain pipe....

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Back up top, ah removed the two nuts holding the heater pipe on....

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and undid the four nuts on top and three below...
Jun
26
Bonnet cable refitting

This is a VERY easy job to do:D
Found out that me cable had snapped when ah went to open the bonnet the other day! So to get the bonnet to open, ah had to remove the grille and push the lever over so it opened. Had a look in the Haynes manual and thought it must be easier than that! Ah undid the 19mm bolt holdin' the pull thing inside the cab, then back to the front removed the wee clip that's just to the left of the lever that the cable fixes to and taped a piece of wire to the end of the cable. Then ah pulled it back through to the front after releasing the cable from the push in clip just under the coolant tank.
Then it was just a case of attachin' the wire to the new cable...

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and pulling it through to the engine bay....

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Keep pullin' the wire...

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...until it's through the wing...

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Then ah attached this clip...

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pushed the cable through the hole where the lever is and stuck on a heavier clamp bolt thingy....

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then ah fixed it to the lever and stuck the clip back onto the panel....

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Back to the other end...

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..and bolted it back in place.......
Jun
26
Here's how I did mine.....

First I drained the oil from the Transfer Box..
Remove the filler plug (a 1/2" ratchet fits)

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Then remove the drain plug...

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and allow the oil to drain into a suitable container....

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jacking up the front of the Landy will make access easier and allow you to rotate the propshaft by turning the wheel. Chock the rear wheels and support on axle stands too for safety...

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Next, you need to remove the front propshaft. Mark the propshaft and the drive flanges, so that you can replace it in the same alignment.

There's not much room to get a socket or spanner on the nuts...

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so, disconnect the diff end first (where there's more space). This then allows you to push the propshaft up (towards the oil filter) and create space to get a socket on the Transfer Box end nuts.
THE NUTS ARE 9/16" NOT 14mm - it makes a big difference!

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Remove the propshaft and you will see a large nylock nut in the centre of the drive flange. Put the Landy in gear and undo this (30mm socket) - it's tight!

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You can then remove the drive flange and spacer washer and expose the Oil Seal.

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Prize the old oil seal out with a screwdriver, taking care not to damage it's seat.

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This was my old Seal - the round spring, which holds it tight on the drive...