1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

LandyZone - Land Rover Forum

 
Sep
23
Steering box renewal

This is how ah did it;)

Jacked up the bus and sat it on axle stands making sure the wheels were pointin' straight ahead...

[​IMG]

The manual says to clamp the pipe to stop any fluid loss...

[​IMG]

tried that but when undoin' the pipe from the box, it wouldn't turn. Ah decided to take it off from the reservoir and let the fluid run out into a bucket. Then ah took off the metal pipe on top of the box...

[​IMG]

Next thing was the collapsable steerin' shaft. Took the four bolts out and wriggled it about a bit untill it came off the box (or look here to see how Ah did it- Collapsible steering shaft removal ) .....

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

that's all the stuff from the top end off.

Underneath now to the drop arm ball joint.
Ah took out the split pin and removed the castle nut and washer then took off the drag link and stick it out of the way....

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

Then ah removed the drop arm (quite easy this time round;) :D )...

[​IMG]

The tie bar was next, took the nut off from the mounting and then the two bolts securin' the bottom of the steering box...

[​IMG]...
Sep
23
Rear axle removal

Here's how ah did it.....

the donor axle..

[​IMG]

ah 'loosened' off the trailin' arm nuts and bottom shock nuts (only because ah wasn't sure how tight or stuck they were, and it would be a bit easier with the bus still on the ground).....

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

slackened the wheel nuts, jacked it up and sat the axle on stands....

[​IMG]

Then secured the bus by stickin' blocks and a couple of pieces of wood under the chassis and took the wheels off....

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

next thing was the brakes...

[​IMG]

Haynes manual says summit about removin' the cap from the reservoir, puttin' some polythene over the hole and stickin' the cap back on to minimise fluid loss, so ah cut a bit off a bin liner and used that (sorry no pic cos the edges weren't neatly trimmed;) :D )

Ah removed the pipes from the brake drums...

[​IMG]

and taped a wee bag over the ends to stop any crap gettin' onto them....

[​IMG]

then ah unid the bracket from the top of the axle...

[​IMG]

and tied them up out of the way......
Sep
23
Front axle removal and swap

Here's how ah did it;):D

First ah loosened the wheels..

[​IMG]

then jacked the bus up using two jacks and supportin' the front with some blocks and a piece of wood to rest the front of the chassis on and used axle stands to support the axle...

[​IMG]

removed the wheels...

[​IMG]

next ah undid the two bolts on the top swivel pin to remove the bracket for the brake pipe, undid the calliper and tied it up out of the way...

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

removed this as well...

[​IMG]

then the prop shaft...

[​IMG]

then it was a case of undoin' the back of the radius arms ( forgot to do pics on the bus, but here's a couple from the other one)...

[​IMG]

removing the front rods and tying them up out of the way...

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

then removin' the radius arms (back tae the bus again)....

[​IMG]

undid the rods and tied them up out of the way (except the back one which ah just put tae one...
Sep
23
Collapsible steering shaft removal

heres how ah did it....

you can either remove the bonnet or shove it straight up using a big stick as a prop, make sure your wheels and steering wheel are pointing straight ahead.
you should then see this...

[​IMG]

Put a mark on the top uj and the bit it fits onto for lining things back up later.
Next remove the two bolts from the top uj.....

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

then the same again with the bottom uj's...

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

It might be a good idea to give the shafts a squirt with Wd or summit and a clean around the uj's.
All that's left to do is wriggle the shafts back and forth a bit until it comes off.....

[​IMG]


Check to see if your uj's or the collapsible bit is ok and refitting is pretty much the reverse.
Job done
;) :D


It might be an idea to check what condition the rubber is like in the collapsible bit, mines was starting to come apart. Luckily I had a spare shaft.
If you look at the first shaft, you should see the rubber coming away....

[​IMG]

just a pic of the new uj's on the cleaner shaft.........
Sep
23
Fuel lift pump removal / renewal

It's quite an easy job to do, so here's how Ah did mine.....

The pump on the engine..

[​IMG]

Stuck a 17mm spanner on the bit where the 'in' pipe goes just so's ah didn't do any damage tae the pump....

[​IMG]

then usin' a 13mm spanner ah cracked the 'in' pipe and removed it from the pump.....

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

Next thing ah did was to remove the pipe from the filter housin' (only because the last time ah did it the pipe got jammed and twisted when takin' it off the pump!) usin' a 19mm spanner..

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

... then removed the 'out pipe from the pump same way as ah did the 'in' pipe.

Usin' a 1/4" drive ratchet, extention bar and a bit holder with an Allen bit ah took of the first Allen bolt on the side of the pump...

[​IMG]

then usin' same again minus the extension bar ah took off the other Allen bolt on the other side of the pump and took the pump off to see this...

[​IMG]

A piccy of the 'old' pump removed..

[​IMG]

and a piccy of the new pump...

[​IMG]

Next a put some sealant on the pump.....
Sep
12
Fuel lift pump removal / renewal

It's quite an easy job to do, so here's how Ah did mine.....

The pump on the engine..

[​IMG]

Stuck a 17mm spanner on the bit where the 'in' pipe goes just so's ah didn't do any damage tae the pump....

[​IMG]

then usin' a 13mm spanner ah cracked the 'in' pipe and removed it from the pump.....

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

Next thing ah did was to remove the pipe from the filter housin' (only because the last time ah did it the pipe got jammed and twisted when takin' it off the pump!) usin' a 19mm spanner..

[​IMG]

[​IMG]

... then removed the 'out pipe from the pump same way as ah did the 'in' pipe.

Usin' a 1/4" drive ratchet, extention bar and a bit holder with an Allen bit ah took of the first Allen bolt on the side of the pump...

[​IMG]

then usin' same again minus the extension bar ah took off the other Allen bolt on the other side of the pump and took the pump off to see this...

[​IMG]

A piccy of the 'old' pump removed..

[​IMG]

and a piccy of the new pump...

[​IMG]

Next a put some sealant on the pump.....
Sep
10
Rust Removal Using Electrolysis
Introduction To The Electrolysis Of Rust

For some time I have had a need to be able to carefully remove rust from steel and iron artifacts and this page came into being as a result of my experiments into trying to achieve just this. I give a respectful nod to the various rust removal pages that were in existence before this one, and to which I was able to refer in the early years whilst doing my initial research; Some of those sites had ommitted detail which I felt the experimenter may need to be aware of, hence my decision to publicise my experiences and try to answer all questions I had.
There are various obvious methods of rust removal, but these methods are unsuitable for very old or valuable artifacts as they tend to be destructive in use, meaning that along with the rust some of the base metal is also removed. Dissolving the rust with acids such as phosphoric acid or even vinegar can produce good results, but this process removes any surface features which may have been preserved in the rust. As I required a way of actually trying to salvage some of the rusted metal rather than just removing or dissolving it, these methods were considered inappropriate. This left the electrolytic method, also known as electrolysis, which involves using the passage of an electric current in an alkaline solution, or electrolyte, to do the job of trying to reconvert some of the corrosion products back into sound iron, whilst loosening the remaining corrosion by converting it to a loosely bound compound.
Please note that electrolytic cleaning is not suitable for non-ferrous metals such as copper, bronze, brass, pewter, tin or aluminium. The corrosion products found on these metals is rarely formed by electrolytic action and therefore the process cannot be reversed electrolytically. In the case of copper and tin alloys the treatment would be harmless, although aluminium could be adversely affected by the...
Aug
28
Doe's any one know if mixing different types of antifreeze causes the antifreeze to gel?
Aug
06
Hopefully you already know that to charge the leisure battery at the same time as the vehicles alternator is charging the starter battery, the simplest option is to connect a wire between the 2 batteries positive terminals, and to ensure that the leisure battery is separated from the starter battery when the engine is not running, you put a switch in that wire, and to do it automatically you can use a relay connected to an ignition switched source, a better way is to use the alternator to trigger the relay so it is only activated when the alternator is actually charging.

[​IMG]

You've probably seen this picture before from the manual switch wiring, it's here with the relay drawn in to show the basics of the split charge systems, all split charge systems have a few things in common, they are.. the leisure battery needs it's negative terminal connected to the vans chassis earth.. the same as the starter battery is wired.. this is to ensure the charge going to the leisure battery gets back to the alternator who's earth is connected to the van's metalwork.. called chassis earth.

You also have a wire from both positive terminals that go to a convenient location where you'll be putting the switch of your choice.. in the case of a manual switch, then the wires would go to where ever you mount the switch.. usually near the dashboard, but the relay can go almost anywhere convenient, it can live near one of the batteries (usually the starter battery for convenience in connecting the relays trigger wire to the alternator or other engine trigger point) but it can go in the middle of the wire if you really wanted it to, just depends on the route you've taken to run the wires from the 2 batteries so they meet at a common location.

And the most important bit, there must be a fuse at the connection to each batteries positive terminal.

The actual wire size you choose to use is largely upto you, but bear in mind voltage...
Aug
05
Disco II Air suspension – the definitive guide!
It's about time someone put all this into one place... so here it is!

All you will ever need to know about Air Suspension.


Simply put, the air suspension on the disco II consists of a couple of balloons at each back wheel.
A way of inflating them independently and a computer to monitor the height of the car and keep it all level.


The Disco II air suspension consists of the following components:

  • Air bags (balloons)
  • Pipes that join the air bags to the valve block and supply air to the compressor
  • A valve block to control independent inflation/deflation of the air bags
  • A compressor to supply compressed air
  • Air scrubbers/filters to clean and de-moisturise the air
  • Ride height sensors to feedback levelling and height information to the computer
  • A computer to control the valve operation and activation of the compressor

Component Locations:

  • Air bags:There are two air bags, one at each back wheel (there is no air suspension on the front)
  • Air Pipes: the supply air to the compressor runs along the chassis to the compressor from behind...